With the holiday season comes the annual surge on our senses…the sights, sounds and aromas. While it may be easy to discern the origin of those holiday movies or songs, do we know what makes the Blue Spruce Christmas tree smell like it does? Or what about those baked goods and that colorful fruit cake adorned with fruits? The answer is terpenes, the same ingredient found in cannabis. Botanically speaking, terpenes are volatile chemical molecules, components that give plants their scents and tastes — some compare these extracts to essential oils. Prolific in plant life, but also found in some insects, they came into existence as an evolutionary tactic to fend off potential predators. In the case of the decorated Christmas tree, all tree varieties have their own terpene profile which somewhat acts as their fingerprint:

Spruce – alpha-pinene (67%), beta-pinene (3%), delta-3-carene (4%), myrcene (1%), limonene (10%), camphene (10%), sabinene (1%), phellandrene (4%)

Pine – alpha-pinene (55%), beta-pinene (1%), delta-3-carene (29%), myrcene (2%), limonene (3%), camphene (4%), sabinene (1%), phellandrene (3%)

  Found in the cannabis plants resin gland, the same place where THC, CBD and other cannabinoids occur, cannabis terpenes protect the plant and give your flower its distinct smell and taste. Over eons cannabis terpenes evolved and now contribute to the overall feeling by binding to the endocannabinoid receptors in your brain, adding to its role in the therapeutic value of your flower in part through the ensemble effect noted in cannabis studies.

  But back to that fruit cake with its ginger (linalool), and clove (beta- caryophyllene) terpenes. Or your baked goods with thyme (myrcene) washed down with a nice hoppy IPA (humulene). The effect that terpenes play in everyday lives and the products we consume are no different than the role they play in cannabis products. The key differentiator being the presence of THC, CBD and a host of other cannabinoids.

  Through interaction at the endo-cannabinoid level, Beta-Caryophyllene has been proven to directly activate our CB2 receptors while delivering especially potent anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-hypertensive qualities. B-Caryophyllene has additional benefits in that it disables the CB1 receptor, reducing the intoxication or anxiety induced by some strains.

  Pinene, found in cannabis strains with that refreshing pine scent, is another potent anti-inflammatory as well as a natural bronchodilator, memory aid and anti-bacterial. Mycrene and its value comes as an anti-oxidant, analgesic and anti-inflammatory, and because it potentiates the effects of THC, Mycrene combined with THC becomes a very potent sedative, perfect for insomnia or high stress situations.

  In sum, we have all read or heard of how attributes found in certain food groups benefit our well-being. And we certainly shop or select many foods based on smell, taste and aroma. Is it any wonder that cannabis, with a similar molecular component, offers some of the same benefits, physiologically or otherwise? So this holiday season, as you ponder the myriad of delectable goodies, remember that the secret to that taste, aroma and affect on the body, whether through food, drink or canna products….all begins with terpenes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

____________________________________________________________________________________

ABOUT SUPERCRITICAL

Headquartered in Chicago, Illinois, Supercritical is an independent investment advisory firm. Its businesses include capital raising readiness, capital introductions, cultivation, and operations.

To learn more about Supercritical, visit https://supercritical.agency/

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________

SUPERCRITICAL  CONTACTS:

Jay Caauwe, Kerry Jordan, Sparky Rose

Co-founders and Managing Partners

Supercritical, LLC

T | 312-894-6260

E | info@supercritical.agency

  With the holiday season comes the annual surge on our senses…the sights, sounds and aromas. While it may be easy to discern the origin of those holiday movies or songs, do we know what makes the Blue Spruce Christmas tree smell like it does? Or what about those baked goods and that colorful fruit cake adorned with fruits? The answer is terpenes, the same ingredient found in cannabis. Botanically speaking, terpenes are volatile chemical molecules, components that give plants their scents and tastes — some compare these extracts to essential oils. Prolific in plant life, but also found in some insects, they came into existence as an evolutionary tactic to fend off potential predators. In the case of the decorated Christmas tree, all tree varieties have their own terpene profile which somewhat acts as their fingerprint:

Spruce – alpha-pinene (67%), beta-pinene (3%), delta-3-carene (4%), myrcene (1%), limonene (10%), camphene (10%), sabinene (1%), phellandrene (4%)

Pine – alpha-pinene (55%), beta-pinene (1%), delta-3-carene (29%), myrcene (2%), limonene (3%), camphene (4%), sabinene (1%), phellandrene (3%)

  Found in the cannabis plants resin gland, the same place where THC, CBD and other cannabinoids occur, cannabis terpenes protect the plant and give your flower its distinct smell and taste. Over eons cannabis terpenes evolved and now contribute to the overall feeling by binding to the endocannabinoid receptors in your brain, adding to its role in the therapeutic value of your flower in part through the ensemble effect noted in cannabis studies.

  But back to that fruit cake with its ginger (linalool), and clove (beta- caryophyllene) terpenes. Or your baked goods with thyme (myrcene) washed down with a nice hoppy IPA (humulene). The effect that terpenes play in everyday lives and the products we consume are no different than the role they play in cannabis products. The key differentiator being the presence of THC, CBD and a host of other cannabinoids.

  Through interaction at the endo-cannabinoid level, Beta-Caryophyllene has been proven to directly activate our CB2 receptors while delivering especially potent anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-hypertensive qualities. B-Caryophyllene has additional benefits in that it disables the CB1 receptor, reducing the intoxication or anxiety induced by some strains.

  Pinene, found in cannabis strains with that refreshing pine scent, is another potent anti-inflammatory as well as a natural bronchodilator, memory aid and anti-bacterial. Mycrene and its value comes as an anti-oxidant, analgesic and anti-inflammatory, and because it potentiates the effects of THC, Mycrene combined with THC becomes a very potent sedative, perfect for insomnia or high stress situations.

  In sum, we have all read or heard of how attributes of certain food groups that benefit our well-being. And we certainly shop or select many foods based on smell, taste and aroma. Is it any wonder that cannabis, with a similar molecular component, offers some of the same benefits, physiologically or otherwise? So this holiday season, as you ponder the myriad of delectable goodies, remember that the secret to that taste, aroma and affect on the body, whether through food, drink or canna products….all begins with terpenes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

____________________________________________________________________________________

ABOUT SUPERCRITICAL

Headquartered in Chicago, Illinois, Supercritical is an independent investment advisory firm. Its businesses include capital raising readiness, capital introductions, cultivation, and operations.

To learn more about Supercritical, visit https://supercritical.agency/

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________

SUPERCRITICAL  CONTACTS:

Jay Caauwe, Kerry Jordan, Sparky Rose

Co-founders and Managing Partners

Supercritical, LLC

T | 312-894-6260

E | info@supercritical.agency